Blog of Rob Galanakis (@robgalanakis)

Old towns, and legacy software

On our road trip from Austin to Portland, we stopped in a handful of towns that were booming in the late 19th century. In particular, Pendleton, Oregon made an impression. They were exhibiting serious effort and success revitalizing the town. Pendleton has a rich and interesting history, but has shrunk (relatively) over the last hundred years. It apparently used to be Oregon’s 4th largest city. There has clearly been a big effort to keep buildings in good condition, create interesting businesses, establish modern dining and arts, and maintain a beautiful and safe river walk. The people who live there seemed to hold a special bond.

Pendleton was quite different from many other towns we saw, which were in decline, derelict, or abandoned.

Pendleton reminded me of my experiences working on legacy software projects. Projects that no one wants to own, that have a successor “coming soon,” or are seen as unimportant; these are depressing to work on. On the other hand, where people have stepped up to really take control of the situation and invest serious passion into a legacy project; special bonds form that are as strong or stronger than can be forged when working on something new.

A town like Pendleton, like a legacy software project, is not going anywhere soon. You can invest in it, make it special, meaningful, and historical. Or you can make it a place for people too old or passive to move from. Towns and legacy software can deteriorate and die. Many have met this fate. Alternatively, they can embrace their legacy and reinvent themselves, with great pride, in the glow of their former selves.

A country of Pendletons is probably not very healthy, but a country with none would lack character and history.